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Seattle Design Center Celebrates 48th Annual Spring Design Week

McGuire_Baker Showroom

McGuire Baker Showroom. Courtresy of Seattle Design Center.

The Seattle Design Center is gearing up for its 48th Annual Spring Design Week. Slated to last May 3-7, the week-long event is packed full of virtual programming, unique merchandise, and more.

The free online event looks to have a broad reach (the center is the only one of its kind in the Pacific Northwest). Presenters come from various parts of the country; audience members don’t have to hail from the area to attend.

“We are so excited at the Design Center this spring,” marketing director Gina Colucci said. “Of course, we miss being in-person, but going virtual has made it so that we can be more inclusive. People who aren’t necessarily here in Seattle can still tune in to our amazing line-up of presenters.”

The opening panel, which is focused on intentional living, will include speakers like Seabrook CEO and co-founder Casey Roloff, town planner Stephen Poulakos, and interior designer Whitney Wiggins.

Other highlights of Design Week include a discussion with Seattle designer and author Brian Paquette as well as a talk with the father and son duo behind the local Glant Textile company. There is also a preview of what’s new at Holland & Sherry with the Katie Leede and Courtney Bishop Collections.

Pre-recorded Design Week presentations and recaps can additionally be found on the Seattle Design Center’s YouTube channel.

The Design Center also will on May 5 debut the first episode of a new podcast series called Inspired Design, which will subsequently put out a 30- to 40-minute episode every week. The pilot features Northwest architect Alan Maskin. A live Q&A conversation between him and Colucci will accompany the release.

The Design Center will still be open during the week. Those shopping or sourcing will have access to programming from within various showrooms.

Check here for more information and to register for virtual programming.